Inside Fatigue Science

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From high tea to hypnotics: Sleep aid starting points for performance athletes

Elite athletes are presumably more aware of the impacts of poor sleep, however, research suggests they're still more likely to use (and possibly abuse) sleep medications.

Springing forward: Tips for managing the daylight savings time change

Adjusting to a one-hour time change shouldn’t take more than a day or so for a regularly well-rested person. But, since studies show that as a society we are already sleep deprived, an hour of our time in bed is not really a sacrifice many of us can afford to make.

2014 Sleep health index: Is your room set up for a healthy sleep?

Only 47% of people reported that their bedrooms were ‘very quiet’, 36% reported their rooms were ‘very dark’, and 56% reported their mattresses were ‘very comfortable’.
FS Blog - Thrive Huffington book
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Fatigue Science work with Dallas Mavericks referenced in Thrive

Fatigue Science's work with the NBA's Dallas Mavericks has been referenced in Arianna Huffington's new bestseller Thrive: The third metric to redefining success and creating a life of well-being, wisdom, and wonder.
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Springing forward: How to deal with the daylight savings time change

There is no quick magic solution for adjusting to this time change, but there are a few things you can do to make sure the effects of this circadian disruption are minimized for Monday morning
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Think you are performing your best with 6 hours of sleep?

One of the studies Arianna Huffington refers to indicates that people who sleep 6 hours per night for two weeks are equally as fatigued as someone who has stayed up for 48 hours.
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Sleep and athlete recovery

Sleep is important to athletes for a number of reasons, including overall performance and recovery.
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Sleep apps: How reliable are they?

Prior to the new year, we referenced a study conducted out of Oxford University which concluded that mobile sleep tracking apps did not provide consistent or validated results.
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Would your workers rather sleep than socialize?

The CBC reports on the survey’s findings citing that over a quarter of participants indicated that they go to work feeling tired, many of them on a daily basis. Two-thirds of the participants said they'd pick a good night’s sleep over a fun night on the town.

Sleepy new year!

Even if you have spent the holidays getting your required 7-9 hours of sleep, just one late night (a New Year's Eve party, perhaps) could impact your performance for as long as a week.

3 good reasons to manage your sleep this holiday season

This time of year, festivities are plenty and most are likely to find themselves participating in numerous social engagements, last minute shopping trips, and family dinners.
FS Blog - young man sleeping
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Tips for athletes to get their rest before a big game

You have done all the training, eaten all the right things, and are feeling ready for the big competition tomorrow. How do you make sure all your confidence isn’t derailed by one bad night of sleep?
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Why you need more sleep

If you're an average adult, chances are you need more sleep. Studies show that 60% of adults are not getting the 7-9 hours of nightly sleep their bodies need in order to function at their best.
FS Blog - Dreamforce Conference

Tips for minimizing fatigue while attending Dreamforce

Now that Dreamforce has kicked off, it’s not likely that many will take our advice to get their 7-9 hours of sleep every night, so we have a few tips which may help minimize the feeling of fatigue while trying to take in all that Dreamforce has to offer.
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Think you have a sleep disorder? There's no app for that... yet

We know that how much you sleep and how long you sleep has a measured impact on human health, safety and performance. Sufficient sleep is defined as 7-9 hours, but there are no shortage of reports available which demonstrate that the average adult is not getting enough.