The basics of sleep

Sleeping – it’s something we all know we need to do on a daily basis, yet with the constant demands of our 24/7 lifestyles we are averaging less sleep than is recommended. In fact, a study conducted by the Centre of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) showed that 37.9% reported unintentionally falling asleep during the day at least once in the preceding month, and 4.7% reported nodding off or falling asleep while driving at least once in the preceding month.

Check out the below infographic to learn more about the basics of sleep including the five stages of sleep we go through, how many people suffer from a sleep disorder in the US, the cost of fatigued drivers on the US healthcare system and more.

Key Takeaways/Tweetables 

  • During sleep we usually pass through five-phases of sleep – TWEET THIS
  • 1 in 3 people in the United States have a sleep problem – TWEET THIS
  • Over 35 million people in the United States have a chronic sleep disorder – TWEET THIS
  • Every year fatigued drivers cause 1 million road accidents – TWEET THIS
  • The annual healthcare cost of fatigued drivers is a whopping 16 billion dollars – TWEET THIS 

basics-of-sleep high res

RELATED POSTS

Paul Marlow with his ReadiBand

Why Do We Need To Sleep? Your Mental Health Will Thank You

In this guest post, Paul Marlow, a leading advocate in mental health, shares the importance of acknowledging World Mental Health Day 2020, on Saturday, October 10th, sleep health, and immunity in the time of COVID-19. 
,

How Drivers Can Get Better Sleep and Prevent Fatigue

Sleep deprivation affects all aspects of life—appetite, strength, emotional stability, and memory. On the road, it’s more than a distraction. It can mean the difference between life and death. Drowsy drivers come from all occupations and walks of life. It’s a threat everyone faces at one time or another. You’re driving home from work after putting in extra hours or a child kept you up during the night and your eyes just won’t stay open. The reasons vary but the results are the same—dangerous driving.
,

Rest and Relaxation- The First Step for Poor Sleepers 

One important job as a performance coach in sports is to balance both the training and recovery with our players. Currently, I am an NHL strength and conditioning coach for the St. Louis Blues, but my role extends beyond the weight room and hockey rink. Sleep is a major component of recovery, and supporting a good night’s rest is everything in sport. Our athletes are perpetually exploring ways of sustaining elite performances. Sleep is arguably the best method available to do so. With endless stressors, high-pressure scenarios, and chaotic travel schedules, it can be difficult to find the off switch when the time comes for sleep. In this article, I share my some personal "bio hacks" for resting more effectively. I also explain why we need to consider more effective strategies for rest, with the ultimate goal of setting ourselves up for higher quality sleep.