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Sleep and athlete recovery

Sleep is important to athletes for a number of reasons, including overall performance and recovery. Think about all the star athletes, who reportedly sleep about 9, 10, or 11 hours a night!

We came across this short video with endurance sports coach, Sage Rountree, talking about the importance of sleep to recovery and performance for runners and multi-sport athletes. “Make good sleep a priority,” she says, “and you will be a better athlete.

Some key takeaways:

  • Sleep is critical to recovery
  • Sleep requirements are individual, but 8-9 hours per night is a ‘noble goal’
  • Poor sleep can be both an indicator of overtraining and a contributing factor to it

She also shares a few tips which  both athletes and workers might find useful in helping to wind down and prepare for a good night’s sleep.

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