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TechCrunch: Fatigue Science lets pro sports teams track their athletes’ sleep

Fatigue Science CEO, Sean Kerklaan, was recently interviewed by Christine Magee of TechCrunch on the Fatigue Science platform and how it provides professional athletes and industry clients with sleep analytics to improve performance and mitigate risk.

“If the Seahawks, for example, have to cross multiple time zones to go play in New York on Sunday night, they need to be able to plan in advance the right amount of sleep for their players so at game time they’re playing their best,” says Sean.

Read the article to learn more about how this technology is improving game-time performance and on-site safety.

SB Nation: Seahawks teaching players ‘sleep is a weapon’

joenicholson-usatodaysports

Joe Nicholson, courtesy USA TODAY Sports

The Seattle Seahawks are on the forefront of player well-being, using a holistic approach that emphasizes the importance of sleep. Sam Ramsden, the Director of Player Health and Performance, contacted Fatigue Science in 2013 after learning how the Vancouver Canucks manage their extreme travel schedule using the Fatigue Science platform. Since then, the Seahawks have been maximizing the performance impact of their sleep.

“Fatigue and performance are intimately linked and sleep is one of the important variables to get right to help athletes sustain high effort and enthusiasm, for the long haul,” Ramsden and Michael Gervais, team psychologist, told Ariana Huffington during an interview on the subject of sleep and performance.

To read more about how the Seahawks are embracing the most unique philosophy in football using Fatigue Science, check out the full article.

Inc.: Sleep culture in the workplace

On a recent trip to San Francisco, Fatigue Science CEO, Sean Kerklaan, sat down with Chip Joyce from Inc.com to discuss how Fatigue Science “is doing to corporations what Billy Beane did to baseball: using hard data to transform performance and safety by teaching companies how to mitigate employee fatigue.”

Sean explains the importance of sleep to productive workplace culture and to CEO success in the segment “CEO 1-2-3.”

“If you’re constantly working in a state of fatigue, it can actually be quite difficult to self-assess the extent of your fatigue and even more difficult to realize your own performance impairments,” Sean says.

Check out the article, including Sean’s three pieces of advice for every CEO.

It’s 3 am, do you know how fatigued your workers are?

When the news of the Chicago train derailment came across our desks last week, we immediately took notice of the time of day the incident occurred. We know from experience and science, that 3 AM is not an optimal time for us to be up and about, performing safety sensitive tasks.

In our 24-hour society, however, the world doesn’t shut down at night so that everyone can go to sleep. Police officers need to respond to emergencies, nurses need to tend to patients, machinery operators need to make sure facilities keep running, and transportation workers need to make sure travellers are delivered safely to their destinations – at all hours of the day.

The responsibility to ensure these, and other shift-related jobs, are performed effectively and without risk to human safety must be shared by both the employer and the worker. There are number of variables which can contribute to someone’s level of fatigue on the job – Are the work shifts inconsistent? Does their work schedule give them enough time off to sleep? Does the worker have a sleep disorder? Does the worker have children at home who are keeping them up? Does the sleeping environment of the worker allow for restful sleep? Does the worker make an effort to obtain 7-9 hours of sleep per day? … this list could go on.

The fact is, all of these specific variables (and more) can be addressed if an employer asks two questions:

  • Does the work schedule provide the worker with the opportunity to maintain regular, sufficient sleep?
  • Is the worker taking advantage of the sleep opportunity being provided to them?

Obtaining objective answers to these questions is actually easier than one might think. The technology and tools to analyze work schedules and measure worker’s sleep is commercially available. (Full disclosure here, we are talking about Fatigue Science technology.) These tools can help employers identify the possibility of worker’s accumulating sleep debt based on their schedules, in a scientifically-validated and meaningful way. They can also help organizations identify if their workers are indeed accumulating risk-inducing levels of sleep debt due to insufficient sleep, whether related to schedule, lifestyle, health or a combination of these factors. By identifying the causes of fatigue in the workplace, organizations and employees can start to manage these variables.

In the case of the O’Hare Airport train crash, the operator has admitted to falling asleep while driving. Additionally, it was noted that she had previously fallen asleep on the job only last month. While it is extremely fortunate there have been no fatalities in either incidents, the risk to human life and the growing financial costs associated with last Monday’s event should serve as a wake up to organizations in any industry. It is not enough to just investigate whether or not fatigue is a factor in a workplace accident, employers and authorities need to take the next steps to address it and reduce the risk of it happening again. Whether a roster of train operators, police officers, or heavy machinery operators, Fatigue can be both measured and managed – before someone makes a mistake that puts themselves, and other human life at risk.

ShawTV: Fatigue Science on go! Vancouver with Johanna Ward

go! Vancouver‘s Johanna Ward met Fatigue Science CEO, Sean Kerklaan, last fall at the BCTIA’s ConnectFX here in Vancouver. She was so intrigued by how our technology could help both athletes optimize their game-time performance and workers operate more safely on the job, that we invited her back to Fatigue Science headquarters to learn more.

In the segment, Sean shows Johanna how Readiband technology works, how managing sleep can improve performance in the workplace, and shares a few tips for a good night’s sleep. Have a watch:

Forbes: Didn’t get enough sleep? You might as well be drunk

Our Readiband, used by the Vancouver Canucks and the US Military, has been featured in Forbes Magazine.

Kelly Clay, a contributor to Forbes, spoke with our founder Pat Byrne about the history behind Fatigue Science, the technology, and how Readiband is helping individuals understand their effectiveness scores in real-time.

In the article titled, Didn’t Get Enough Sleep? You Might As Well Be Drunk, Clay says that “Readiband serves to drive actionable, behaviour changing insights around sleep patterns and human performance in a practical and scientifically valid way.”