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HP Matter: How wearable technology is helping one team overcome its biggest travel health nightmare

The Seattle Mariners traveled 51,634 miles during this year’s regular season, the most in the major leagues and the equivalent of flying around the earth twice.

With all that travel time, the Mariners must take care of their most important assets—their players—by combating a problem that every C-suite traveler knows all too well: fatigue.

Seattle recently began using a state-of-the-art piece of wearable technology known as the Readiband to provide a personalized answer. The wearable wrist device is made by Fatigue Science…”

Read more on HP Matter

 

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How fatigued employees affect your business

The long-term impact of sleep deprivation on employees is real and tangible. It is estimated that 30% of employees sleep fewer than six hours a night. This accumulation of sleep debt can lead to less energy, poorer cognitive function, less productivity, and a decreased ability to cope with stress in the workplace.

This infographic from the Pulse Institute demonstrates the challenges to workplace productivity that exist when employees are not sufficiently rested, including:

  • 23% reduced concentration
  • 18% reduced memory function
  • 9% increased difficulty in performing work or volunteer tasks

Fatigued workers contribute to on the job errors – the cost of which affects an organization’s performance, safety and bottom line. What are you doing to address fatigue in your workforce?

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Why you need more sleep

If you’re an average adult, chances are you need more sleep. Studies show that 60% of adults are not getting the 7-9 hours of nightly sleep their bodies need in order to function at their best.

Insufficient sleep doesn’t just manifest itself in the form of feeling tired – over time, it puts people at risk of increased health problems, weight gain, poor judgement and cognitive function and accidents.

The good news is – much like diet and exercise – if you start making it a priority, you can start to reap the health and functional benefits of getting more sleep! Obtaining sufficient sleep has been associated with better health, improved memory, increased sports performance, higher grades in school, lower body weight and decreased stress.

Sleep your way to better business

We often hear of tales of the “Sleepless Elite” who forgo sufficient sleep in order to get ahead. Prominent leaders and business CEO’s such as Marissa Myer, Donald Trump and Condolezza Rice all claim the key to their success has been by getting less than 6 hours of sleep a night. However, the influence of these sleepless elite are having a serious effect on the younger members of our society. A recent post by our CEO, Sean Kerklann, highlighted how unpaid interns are feeling the pressure to work extremely long hours in order to get ahead – in two instances these internships have lead to deaths.

The truth is, lack of sufficient sleep can affect not only your productivity but it can also increase your accident risk and can lead to health conditions such as obesity and diabetes. Here at Fatigue Science we regularly see how fatiguing our 24/7 society is and how it is effecting workplace safety, performance and productivity.

We recently found this infographic from AirMattress.com detailing on why getting enough sleep is the key to getting ahead.

 

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Why athletes should make sleep a priority in their daily training

In 2008, Usain Bolt broke records at the Beijing Olympics by being the first person in history to hold both the 100m and 200m world records. By the 2012 Olympics, Bolt became the first man in history to win 6 Olympic gold medals in sprinting.

So what does Bolt consider to be the most important part of his daily training regime? None other than sleep.

“Sleep is extremely important to me – I need to rest and recover in order for the training I do to be absorbed by my body” – Usain Bolt.

At Fatigue Science we know how important sleep is to an athletes performance, reaction time and recovery time. Our fatigue measurement technology is used by professional sports teams such as the Vancouver Canucks to ensure enough sleep is incorporated into athletes training regimes.

So how much sleep do the professionals get? And how can sleep reduction effect your performance.

Key Infographic Takeaways

  • By incorporating adequate sleep into their routine, tennis players get a 42% boost in hitting accuracy
  • Sleep improves split-second decision making ability by 4.3%
  • After 4 days of restricted sleep, athletes maximum bench press drops 20lbs
  • Roger Federer gets 11 to 12 hours sleep per night
  • Lebron James gets 12 hours of sleep per night

 

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The basics of sleep

Sleeping – it’s something we all know we need to do on a daily basis, yet with the constant demands of our 24/7 lifestyles we are averaging less sleep than is recommended. In fact, a study conducted by the Centre of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) showed that 37.9% reported unintentionally falling asleep during the day at least once in the preceding month, and 4.7% reported nodding off or falling asleep while driving at least once in the preceding month.

Check out the below infographic to learn more about the basics of sleep including the five stages of sleep we go through, how many people suffer from a sleep disorder in the US, the cost of fatigued drivers on the US healthcare system and more.

Key Takeaways/Tweetables 

  • During sleep we usually pass through five-phases of sleep – TWEET THIS
  • 1 in 3 people in the United States have a sleep problem – TWEET THIS
  • Over 35 million people in the United States have a chronic sleep disorder – TWEET THIS
  • Every year fatigued drivers cause 1 million road accidents – TWEET THIS
  • The annual healthcare cost of fatigued drivers is a whopping 16 billion dollars – TWEET THIS 

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