Top 5 reasons you should take advantage of daylight savings ‘free’ hour of sleep.

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You can be prettier, smarter, a better athlete – and it won’t cost you a cent.  What’s the catch? Sleep.

On November 3rd, daylight savings kicks in and ‘falling back’ means you get an extra hour in your day. Fatigue Science founder and internationally recognized sleep expert, Pat Byrne, thinks you should use this extra hour to sleep. We’ve all seen research and studies dictate that adults require 7-9 hours of sleep per night for a number of biological reasons that affect health, safety and performance but what exactly does that mean for you?

Here are the Top 5 reasons why you should take advantage of daylight savings “free” hour of sleep:

  1. Reduce your accident risk by 11% – Tired people are like drunk people in terms of performance and judgement. Sleep, even just one extra hour, makes you safer.
  2. Improve your grades at school – Sleep is when your brain consolidates memories so you can recall what you’ve learned during the day.
  3. Improve your reaction time by 5% – If you’re playing sports, this can mean the difference between winning or losing a game.
  4. Look prettier – When you sleep a hormone that helps repair tissue damage is released, keeping your skin in youthful condition.
  5. Lose weight – Well rested people have decreased hunger and cravings.

Don’t shortchange your health and performance by investing this found time elsewhere – On November 3rd, take your free hour and sleep.

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